Taking a Team Approach to Retirement Savings

Now that it’s common for families to have two wage earners, many married couples accumulate assets in separate accounts. They might each have savings in an employer-sponsored plan and perhaps one or more IRAs as well.

Even when most of a couple’s retirement assets reside in different accounts, it’s still possible to craft a unified savings and investment strategy. Communication and teamwork are good for a marriage in general, and working together could help create a stronger financial future.

Mars and Venus

Research has consistently shown that men and women have different investment approaches. Individual strategies vary, of course, but in general men tend to be more aggressive and trade more frequently, while women tend to be more methodical and embrace a buy-and-hold strategy.1

Over the long term, women may be more successful investors — one study found that their returns outpaced men’s by about 0.4%, while another found a difference of 1.2%.2 But women do not invest as much or as early in their lives and may be overly cautious. A recent survey found that women keep more assets in cash than men do, which will result in the loss of purchasing power over time.3

Shared Strategies

These differences suggest that a married couple might have much to gain by discussing their goals and philosophies for savings and investments, and by considering their accounts holistically. This does not mean that every decision must be made together. But it could be helpful to look together at the larger picture.

Owning and managing separate portfolios allows each spouse to choose investments based on his or her individual risk tolerance. Some couples may prefer to maintain a high level of independence for this reason, especially if one spouse is more comfortable with market volatility than the other. Employing different investment strategies might also increase the diversification of family assets as long as the approaches are not completely contradictory.

On the other hand, coordinating investments might help some families build more wealth over time. For example, one spouse’s employer may offer a better match for employee contributions, so it might be wise to prioritize contributions to that plan in order to obtain the full match. One workplace plan might offer a broader and/or more appealing selection of investment options, while the offerings in another plan may be limited. With a joint strategy, both spouses agree on an appropriate asset allocation for their combined savings, and their contributions are invested in a way that takes advantage of each plan’s strengths while avoiding any weaknesses.

Whether you make investment decisions separately for individual accounts or share decisions for all of your accounts, keep in mind that retirement assets generally belong to both of you. You may benefit by talking as a couple with your financial advisor.

Asset allocation and diversification are methods to help manage investment risk; they do not guarantee a profit or protect against loss. Although there is no assurance that working with a financial professional will improve investment results, a professional who focuses on your overall financial objectives can help you consider strategies that could have a substantial effect on your long-term financial situation.

1–2) Investor’s Business Daily, July 16, 2018
3) Money, February 12, 2018

This information is not intended as tax, legal, investment, or retirement advice or recommendations, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. You are encouraged to seek advice from an independent professional advisor. The content is derived from sources believed to be accurate. Neither the information presented nor any opinion expressed constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. This material was written and prepared by Broadridge Advisor Solutions. © 2019 Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc.

Doubling Your Money

How Long Will It Take to Double My Money?
Before making any investment decision, one of the key elements you face is working out the real rate of return on your investment.

Compound interest is critical to investment growth. Whether your financial portfolio consists solely of a deposit account at your local bank or a series of highly leveraged investments, your rate of return is dramatically improved by the compounding factor.

With simple interest, interest is paid just on the principal. With compound interest, the return that you receive on your initial investment is automatically reinvested. In other words, you receive interest on the interest.

But just how quickly does your money grow? The easiest way to work that out is by using what’s known as the “Rule of 72.”1 Quite simply, the “Rule of 72” enables you to determine how long it will take for the money you’ve invested on a compound interest basis to double. You divide 72 by the interest rate to get the answer.

For example, if you invest $10,000 at 10 percent compound interest, then the “Rule of 72” states that in 7.2 years you will have $20,000. You divide 72 by 10 percent to get the time it takes for your money to double. The “Rule of 72” is a rule of thumb that gives approximate results. It is most accurate for hypothetical rates between 5 and 20 percent.

While compound interest is a great ally to an investor, inflation is one of the greatest enemies. The “Rule of 72” can also highlight the damage that inflation can do to your money.

Let’s say you decide not to invest your $10,000 but hide it under your mattress instead. Assuming an inflation rate of 4.5 percent, in 16 years your $10,000 will have lost half of its value.

The real rate of return is the key to how quickly the value of your investment will grow. If you are receiving 10 percent interest on an investment but inflation is running at 4 percent, then your real rate of return is 6 percent. In such a scenario, it will take your money 12 years to double in value.

The “Rule of 72” is a quick and easy way to determine the value of compound interest over time. By taking the real rate of return into consideration (nominal interest less inflation), you can see how soon a particular investment will double the value of your money.

The Rule of 72 is a mathematical concept, and the hypothetical return illustrated is not representative of a specific investment. Also note that the principal and yield of securities will fluctuate with changes in market conditions so that the shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost.The Rule of 72 does not include adjustments for income or taxation. It assumes that interest is compounded annually. Actual results will vary.

The information in this newsletter is not intended as tax, legal, investment, or retirement advice or recommendations, and it may not be relied on for the ­purpose of ­avoiding any ­federal tax penalties. You are encouraged to seek advice from an independent professional ­advisor. The content is derived from sources believed to be accurate. Neither the information presented nor any opinion expressed constitutes a solicitation for the ­purchase or sale of any security. This material was written and prepared by Broadridge Advisor Solutions. © 2019 Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc.